Participate In Research

Would you like to be a part of ground breaking medical research? Researchers in our faculty frequently undertake clinical trials to test new medical treatments and interventions. Your participation is crucial to improving the health of our population. Explore our currently enrolling trials below.

What is a clinical trial, and why do we need them?

Clinical trials are research studies that involve human volunteers who are assigned to one or more health-related interventions to evaluate the effects on health outcomes. Clinical trials are essential for the development of new medical treatments and interventions. They are used to determine if a new intervention works, if it is safe, and whether or not it is an improvement on currently available treatments.

The following trials are currently seeking participants:

  • Reading and memory study

    Dyslexia affects approximately 10% of the population and children with dyslexia struggle to acquire literacy skills despite normal intelligence. Previous research has described dyslexia as an issue processing the sounds in words (phonics) but research has shown many dyslexics do not have an issue in this area and current treatments are ineffective for them. Research has also shown many dyslexic students have issues with memory and that this may explain the difficulties experienced by them. Exploring the extent memory difficulties impact reading is the purpose of this research. 

    For this research I am seeking both students with dyslexia and those without dyslexia. They will attend two sessions in the develop well laboratory, where their memory and general reading ability will be tested. As many of these tests are used in the dyslexia diagnosis, they will give you an indicator of whether your child should be referred for a dyslexia assessment. Unfortunately, I cannot give a formal dyslexia diagnosis. 

    Eligibility requirements

    You child may be eligible to participate in this study if they are:

    • Attending year 5 or 6
    • Are a native English speaker
    • Have no sensory difficulties such as blindness or deafness (wearing glasses is fine)

    Contact details for registrations of interest

    For further information, or if you would like to participate, please contact me via the email address below

    EmailJeremy.blackwell@adelaide.edu.au 

  • Effects of the influenza vaccination on cognition, speech tasks, physical movement and immunological responses; a two-way crossover double-blinded placebo controlled study

    This research project is about understanding how our bodies respond to the influenza vaccine. We already know that following the administration of a vaccine, our innate (inborn/natural/inherent) immune system responds as it tries to make sense of the vaccine. Some people feel mild symptoms after they receive the influenza vaccine. It has been reported in the Australian Immunisation Handbook that approximately 1-10% of people will experience mild fever, malaise (general feeling of illness/discomfort) and myalgia (muscles aches and pains). These symptoms form part of our bodies defence system (our innate immune system) and we call this an illness response. This illness response results in you feeling unwell, like you may be coming down with a cold (or ironically, the flu), and also has the potential to impair your thinking and cognitive processing. These mind and body changes, though acute, can significantly impact some individuals’ ability to perform their normal daily activities.

    If you are eligible for our study, you will be volunteering to attend the Advanced Cognitive and Experimental Psychology (ACEP) Clinic in the Hughes building on two separate occasions for approximately 10 hours on each study day. By the end of the study, after you have attended the ACEP Clinic twice, you will have received a placebo (saline) injection and an influenza injection, but you will not be told which treatment you received during the study days. During both study days, you will be asked to perform a range of cognitive, speech and physical tasks at specified timepoints. We will also be measuring your brain electrophysiological activity using an electroencephalograph (EEG; a cap that you wear over your head with electrodes that is attached to a computer), your heart rate, and we also take blood samples from you. Due to the amount of times we are taking blood from you, we will insert a cannula (a thin tube that can be inserted into a vein for easy blood sampling) into your non-dominant arm.


    This study has been approved by the Bellberry Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC) and The University of Adelaide’s HREC (approval number 2023-03-238). Universal Trial Number U1111-1293-1315. The trial has also been registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12623000650695) and can be viewed via the following link https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=385973&isClinicalTrial=False.

    Eligibility requirements

    You may be eligible to participate in this study if you are:

    • are healthy and between 18 and 40 years of age.
    • have no history of seizures, head injury or head physiognomy (head shape) that would preclude electroencephalograph (EEG) cap placement.
    • are able to provide written and informed consent in English.
    • are willing to receive the influenza vaccination during the trial.
    • have a body weight greater than 50 kg (minimum blood donation weight set by the Red Cross Blood Bank; BMI index between 18.5-29.9).
    • are a non-smoker or have ceased smoking for more than 3 months.

    Upon successful completion of our study (attending one pre-screening session and attending the ACEP Clinic on two separate occasions approx. 4-8 weeks apart), participants will receive an honorarium $400 gift card for your time.

    Contact details for registrations of interest
    For more details on the inclusion/exclusion criteria and to check your eligibility, contact

    Dr Juliana Bajic
    Juliana.bajic@adelaide.edu.au
    0424 724 916

    Dr Bajic will send you more information on the study, if you remain interested in participating in our study, you will be invited to attend a pre-screening session held at the university (approx. 1h) which will give you the chance to meet some of the research team, ask questions about the study, check your eligibility and provide consent. If you are eligible and consent to being enrolled in the study, during this session we will take some measurements and run a few simple pre-baseline tests on you, that you will be asked to repeat on the study days.

  • New technology for new parents

    This study is being conducted by the staff at the Women’s and Children’s Hospital and the University of Adelaide, testing a new web-based program for mothers and their partners. The program begins at 26 weeks gestation and is designed to provide parents with information about their unborn child’s development, how to help manage problems with an infant sleeping or crying, and how to best cope when feeling stressed by the demands of caring for their baby.

    Parents who are allocated to the intervention group will meet online with the study's research psychologist at approximately 26 weeks of pregnancy to learn how their baby is growing and how to better get to know their baby during pregnancy. They will also have 2D/3D/4D (non-medical) ultrasounds at 28 and 34 weeks of pregnancy when they can view their baby in real time, and together with our psychologist observe what their baby is doing. After their baby is born, they will meet online with our psychologist when their baby is 2 weeks and 6 weeks old for support about how to care for themselves and their baby during stressful times.

    This study has been approved by the Human Research Ethics Committee at the Women’s and Children’s Hospital (2021/HRE00263) and the University of Adelaide (notification reference: 35434).

    Eligibility requirements

    You may be eligible to participate in this study if you:

    • are less than 26 weeks pregnant and due to have your baby before September 2023
    • are planning to have your baby at the Women’s and Children’s Hospital
    • are expecting one baby (no twins or triplets)
    • don't require an interpreter at your hospital appointment
    • have access to the internet via PC or iOS/Android phone or tablet

    Potential participants undergo further eligibility screening over the phone with our research midwife.

    Contact details for registrations of interest

    For further information, or if you would like to participate, please register your interest by clicking the box below or contact the research midwife directly:

    Register your interest

    Emailparentstudywch@adelaide.edu.au
    Phone: 0411 940 329

  • Effect of exercise on chronic neck pain with central sensitisation

    In a recent study, we found that exercise is effective for some, but not others, in the treatment for chronic neck pain. This difference could be due to the presence of central sensitisation (i.e. altered pain sensitivity) in some individuals. We also found that exercise-derived lactate may play a potential role in the hypoalgesic (i.e. decreased pain sensitivity) effect of exercise.

    In this new study, we aim to investigate the effect of two different exercise-intensity in people with chronic neck pain, and the role of exercise-derived lactate in altering pain sensitivity.

    It is widely acknowledged that exercise is important for maintaining a good physical and mental health, mood and cognition. The effectiveness on health outcomes in individuals with chronic pain, however, has shown to vary across different populations and different types of exercise.

    Participants in this study will engage in 2 assessment sessions conducted by an exericse physiologist, and it is possible that you will experience positive effects on your health outcomes. Participants will undergo assessments for measures of central sensitisation, and perform a 30-minute cycling exercise, during each session. Participants can choose to receive a plain language summary of the study results.

    All aspects of this study, including the exercise physiologist-delivered exercise session, are FREE – there are no costs involved for the participant. Upon successful completion of the study, participants will receive a $20 gift voucher as an honorarium for their time.

    Eligibility requirements

    You may be eligible to participate in this study if you:

    • have chronic neck pain for more than 12 weeks
    • are aged 19-65 years.

    In addition to the above, you will be ineligible to participate in this study if you:

    • have had surgery to the neck
    • have known or suspected serious spinal pathology
    • have confirmed fracture or dislocation at time of injury
    • have nerve root compression
    • have had history or presentation of psychosis, bipolar disorder, organic brain disorder or severe depression
    • are currently or had history of taking anti-depressant or anti-convulsant medication
    • have comorbidities preventing from regular exercise.

    Contact details for registrations of interest

    For further information, or if you would like to participate, please contact:

    Kenneth Chen
    Email: kexunkenneth.chen@adelaide.edu.au (include 'NECK PAIN' in the email subject line)

  • The physiological and behavioural effects of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in post-stroke aphasia

    We are looking for adult volunteers living with post-stroke aphasia.

    Participants in this study will receive repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). rTMS is a method to increase activity of the brain after stroke. This technique is safe and non-invasive, and has shown early promising results as a treatment for aphasia, but further experiments are required to understand its physiological and behavioural effects. Participants will attend 3 in-person sessions at the University of Adelaide, 2 of which will involve rTMS. Each session will last 1-2 hours. The study will be held at the University of Adelaide Health and Medical Sciences Building on North Terrace. All participants will receive a $20 gift card per hour (up to $100).

    Eligibility requirements

    You may be eligible to participate in this study if you:

    • are aged 18-75 years
    • were right-handed prior to the stroke
    • speak English as a first language
    • have a diagnosis of non-fluent aphasia due to stroke
    • have had a stroke 6 or more months ago (chronic)
    • have had only one known stroke event

    Contact details for registrations of interest

    For further information, or if you would like to participate, please contact:

    Ellen Williams
    Email: ellen.williams@adelaide.edu.au

  • Diabetes and emotional wellbeing study

    Type 2 diabetes, a condition typically seen in adults, is becoming more common in adolescents and young people. There are no studies evaluating the emotional impact of Type 2 Diabetes on adolescents and young people, which is called 'diabetes distress'.

    Participate in this study investigating how Type 2 Diabetes impacts young people. This will also help us develop ways to better support young people living with Type 2 diabetes.

    You will need to complete three short questionnaires (total duration of less than 30 minutes) about your experience living with diabetes and your wellbeing in general. These surveys can either be completed from home (online or via mail/email) or in-person, depending on your preference.

    Your participation in this study will give us important information about how living with Type 2 Diabetes affects young people and how we best support the emotional wellbeing of this patient group.

    Eligibility requirements

    You may be eligible to participate in this study if you:

    • are aged 10-19
    • have been diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes

    Contact details for registrations of interest

    For further information, or if you would like to participate, please contact:

    Dana Spajic
    Phone:
     0413 356 186
    Email: dana.spajic@student.adelaide.edu.au

  • Saliva lithium monitoring

    Patients taking lithium medication need to get regular blood tests to ensure they are on effective and safe dose. This study aims to look at whether we can reliably measure lithium levels in saliva, a much less invasive alternative to collecting blood. 

    Participants will be required to provide a blood through a blood draw and a saliva sample through drool collection. We will look at whether the lithium levels in both samples match each other. 

    Samples may be provided at a number of SA Health sites across Adelaide, or at the Adelaide Health and Medical Sciences building on North Terrace in the Adelaide CBD. A convenient location will be organised with participants once recruited for study.

    The sample collection will take between 30 minutes to 1 hour and participants will receive a $20 Coles/Myer gift voucher honorarium after successful completion of the study.

    Eligibility requirements

    You may be eligible to participate in this study if you:

    • are aged 18-65
    • are currently taking lithium medications

    Contact details for registrations of interest

    For further information, or if you would like to participate, please contact:

    Phone: (08) 8313 7676
    Email: psychiatry_res@adelaide.edu.au

  • Brain function and movement control in young and older adults

    We are looking for healthy volunteers to investigate how the brain functions to control skilled hand movements, its ability to change its connections (neuroplasticity), and how this changes with age.

    The study will involve an assessment of the pathway from the brain to the muscles by giving a series of brief (painless) magnetic pulses that make the hand twitch briefly. The electrical activity in these muscles is measured with electrodes placed on the skin. 

    Participants will be required to attend several (2 to 4) sessions at the Neurophysiology of Human Movement Laboratories on Level 4 of the Helen Mayo South Building on Frome Road in the Adelaide CBD. Each session will last from 2-3 hours participants will receive a $30 gift voucher honorarium for each successful session they complete.

    Eligibility requirements

    You may be eligible to participate in this study if you:

    • are aged 18-35 or 60-80 years
    • are right handed
    • have no history of neurological impairments (e.g. epilepsy) or brain injury
    • are not using medications that affect neurological function (e.g. antidepressants, sedatives, antipsychotics)
    • do not have a cardiac pacemaker

    Contact details for registrations of interest

    For further information, or if you would like to participate, please contact:

    Neurophysiology of Human Movement Group
    Email: neuromotor_lab@adelaide.edu.au

  • Impact of placement of visual information in the visual field to the ability to navigate in the environment and deploy attention

    Augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) systems are becoming more prevalent in both our personal and working lives. However, we do not yet have a good understanding about how visual performance using these systems changes when we are interacting with the environment (standing or walking).

    This study will help us understand how the placement of visual information in an AR / VR setting may impact visual processing and the ability to perform movements, interact with the environment and to deploy attention, especially when you are sitting, standing, or walking.

    As part of this study, participants will be required to:

    • Complete one testing session of about two hours at the Gait Analysis Laboratory, located in the Adelaide Health and Medical Sciences building on North Terrace
    • Complete a pre-screen fitness test similar to the Australian Army basic entry requirements (including push-ups, sit-ups, and shuttle run)
    • Have their eye movements and body position recorded using special sensors / cameras 
    • Complete a visual processing task (on screen or in VR) while sitting, standing, or walking
    • Upon successful completion of this study, participants will receive an honorarium of $50.

    Eligibility requirements

    You may be eligible to participate in this study if you:

    • are aged 18-50 years
    • are free from major visual deficits 
    • have a good understanding of the English language

    Contact details for registrations of interest

    For further information, or if you would like to participate, please contact:

    Active Vision Lab
    Phone: (08) 8313 4321
    Email: activevisionlab1@gmail.com

  • Nutrients and gut function

    Factors that control food intake, sugar levels in our blood, and the function of the stomach and small intestine are complex, and our understanding of them is far from complete. People vary in their eating habits, and this may also affect their ability to maintain a healthy digestive and metabolic system, and a healthy body weight. The composition of the foods that we eat can play an important role in regulating these factors, thereby keeping us healthy. 

    Our studies investigate the effects of various dietary nutrients, and taste compounds, on factors such as the contractions of the gut wall, the rate at which a meal empties from the stomach, the release of intestinal hormones, and the blood glucose response to a meal.

    Upon successful completion of our studies, participants will receive an honorarium of up to $400 (dependent on the requirements of the particular study) via EFT transfer.

    Eligibility requirements

    Our research group is conducting a number of various studies with the following eligibility requirements. You may be eligible to participate in our studies if you are:

    • aged 18-60, healthy, BMI 19-25kg/m2
    • aged 18-70, type 2 diabetic (T2D), BMI 19-35kg/m2
    • a non-smoker
    • not pregnant, breastfeeding, or taking hormonal contraception
    • not vegan/vegetarian (consumption of a beef or tuna meal is required)

    Contact details for registrations of interest

    For further information, or if you would like to participate, please contact:

    Nutrients GI Research team
    Email: nutrientresearch@adelaide.edu.au (include 'T2 DIABETIC' or 'HEALTHY' in the email subject line)

  • Exercise-induced structural and functional brain changes in individuals with chronic neck pain

    In a recent study, we found several differences in the structural and functional characteristics of the brain between people with chronic neck pain and pain-free controls. We also found that exercise therapy appeared to have different effects on the brain in people with chronic neck pain.

    In this new study, we aim to investigate those exercise-induced brain changes in people with chronic neck pain. In order to do that, participants will have an MRI scan at baseline, then participate in an 8-week exercise program, and then have their follow-up MRI scan to assess specifically what effects physical exercise has on the brain in people with chronic neck pain. 

    It is widely acknowledged that exercise is important for maintaining a good physical and mental health, mood and cognition. The effectiveness on health outcomes in individuals with chronic pain, however, has shown to vary across different populations and different types of exercise. 

    Participants in this study will engage in an 8-week exercise program, delivered by a physiotherapist from myPhysioSA Payneham, and it is possible that you will experience positive effects on your health outcomes. Each participant will also undergo two 30-min brain MRI scans at the South Australian Health & Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI) on North Terrace, Adelaide. Participants can indicate they wish to receive images of their brain. Participants can choose to receive a plain language summary of the study results.

    All aspects of this study, including the physiotherapist-delivered exercise program and the brain MRI scans, are FREE – there are no costs involved for the participant.

    Eligibility requirements

    You may be eligible to participate in this study if you:

    • have chronic neck pain at moderate intensity (>12 weeks)
    • are aged 18-55 years 
    • currently have a low level of physical activity
    • are able to lie in an MRI scanner on your back for 30 minutes
    • are free from metal implants or pacemaker (or other MRI contraindicators)
    • have English proficiency level to understand Participant Information Sheet

    In addition to the above, you will be ineligible to participate in this study if you:

    • have a history of migraine headaches
    • have had surgery to the neck
    • have diabetes
    • are currently receiving treatment for your neck pain (e.g. physiotherapy, chiropractic, acupuncture, or similar) 
    • have comorbidities preventing from regular exercise
    • are pregnant or breastfeeding
    • are claustrophobic

    Contact details for registrations of interest

    For further information, or if you would like to participate, please contact:

    Dr Rutger de Zoete
    Email: rutger.dezoete@adelaide.edu.au (include 'NECK PAIN' in the email subject line)

  • Brain plasticity study

    Brain plasticity is essential for learning and memory in humans. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a powerful tool for non-invasively inducing plasticity in the human brain, opening exciting possibilities for its therapeutic application in depression and other psychiatric disorders.

    However, despite the popularity of TMS in clinical research, its effects on brain activity and behaviour can vary dramatically from one individual to the next.

    In this study, we will examine whether a novel TMS paradigm (termed repetitive paired-pulse TMS) is able to induce brain plasticity in humans, more reliably. The results will have important implications for guiding the therapeutic application of TMS.

    Participants will be required to attend 3 sessions, 2 hours each where you will undergo non-invasive brain stimulation procedure to interpret how particular TMS protocols affect plasticity in the brain. This study will be conducted at the Clinical Research Facility, located on the 4th floor of the Adelaide Health and Medical Science building on North Terrace. All individuals who participate in this study will receive an honorarium of $20 per session ($60 in total).

    Eligibility requirements

    You may be eligible to participate in this study if you:

    • are aged 18-50 years
    • have not been diagnosed with neuropsychological disorder
    • have not been diagnosed with head trauma
    • have not been implanted with a medical device
    • have not undergone or experienced spinal cord surgery and/or injury

    Contact details for registrations of interest

    For further information, or if you would like to participate, please contact:

  • Effects of neuromodulation on brain excitability, fatigability and motor performance following an isometric fatiguing exercise protocol

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a neuromodulation technique that has been used previously to enhance fatigability and improve performance in simple motor tasks. However, its effect on brain excitability and motor performance after exercise in young and older adults is yet to be determined

    In this experiment, participants will receive three separate treatments of tDCS over a three-week period at the Helen Mayo South Building (Frome Road, Adelaide) and will be required to perform a sustained submaximal isometric fatiguing exercise of the elbow flexor muscles during each session. Brain excitability will be measured using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), a painlesss non-invasive method of brain stimulation. Each session will last ~2.5 hrs and participants will be compensated $15 per hour in Coles/Myer gift cards as reimbursement for their time.

    Eligibility requirements

    You may be eligible to participate in this study if you:

    • are aged 18-35 or 60-85 years 
    • have no history of epilepsy or seizures
    • are not currently on any psychoactive medication such as antidepressants, antipsychotics, or sedatives
    • have no history of a stroke or metal implants in the skull
    • have no history of arthritis in the wrist or elbow
    • have no cardiac pacemakers

    Contact details for registrations of interest

    For further information, or if you would like to participate, please contact:

    Miss Lavender Otieno
    Email: lavender.otieno@adelaide.edu.au (include 'FATIGUING STUDY' in the email subject line)

  • Diet for dads sperm study

    This study aims to test whether improving nutrient intake of men who are obese can improve sperm quality, without the need for weight loss after 12 weeks of dietary intervention. 

    If you meet the study eligibility criteria and consent to participate, you will be scheduled for a first assessment in our clinical rooms, located in the Adelaide CBD at the Adelaide Health and Medical Sciences Building on North Terrace, which will approximately take 30 mins. This will include:

    • Online medical and sexual history questionnaires, 
    • Height, weight, waist circumference measurements, 
    • Body composition measurement by a body image analyser (BIA), 
    • Fasted whole blood sampling for measurements of glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides, 
    • Blood pressure, 
    • Semen analysis, 
    • Fitted with an actigraphy device (Actiwatch - wGT3X-BT) to monitor daily movements and sleep/awake patterns for a week. 
    • Provided information about how to record your 3-day food diaries on the mobile phone app Research Food Diary. 
    • Following on from this appointment, you will be randomised into either a control or intervention group.

    If you are allocated to the control group, you will have meet with our clinical trials coordinator who will provide the Australian guidelines on healthy eating, exercise, sleep and alcohol intake plus give you a run-down of the requirements during the 12-week intervention. Following the 12-week intervention, men in the control will also have the opportunity to have an appointment with a clinical dietician for education and administering of nutrient diet plans. 

    If allocated to the intervention group you will be prescribed the CSIRO Total Wellbeing Diet for Men and be allocated to four appointments with a clinical dietician from the CSIRO over a period of 12-weeks for nutritional prescription and maintenance of body weight. 

    Additional requirements of men during the 12-week intervention include recording of 3-day food diaries (Research Food Diary) every 2 weeks (Baseline, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 weeks) and weekly at home measurements of body weight. 

    At each semen sample collection point (Week 1 and Week 12), you will receive a free semen analysis, and, once your participation in the study is completed (Week 12), you will receive a total of $150 in Coles/Myer gift vouchers to thank you for your participation.

    Eligibility requirements

    You may be eligible to participate in this study if you:

    • are male
    • are aged 18-55 years
    • have BMI >30

    Contact details for registrations of interest

    For further information, or if you would like to participate, please contact:

    Nicola Mathews
    Email: nicola.mathews@adelaide.edu.au (include 'D4Ds' in the email subject line)

  • Night shift worker protein preload study

    In this study, we are investigating how a protein supplement at dinner time may improve your blood glucose control overnight.

    As part of the study, you will need to attend one of our clinical research facilities on 5 separate occasions over a 6-week period at the South Australian Health & Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI) on North Terrace, Adelaide. You will be reimbursed for your time with a $200 honorarium via direct EFT deposit after you have attended all sessions.

    Eligibility requirements

    You may be eligible to participate in this study if you:

    • are female
    • are aged 35-65 years
    • are overweight or obese (BMI 28-35 kg/m2)
    • work night shifts (either in a rotating, permanent, or split shift schedule)

    Contact details for registrations of interest

    For further information, or if you would like to participate, please contact:

    Dr Amy Hutchison
    Phone: (08) 8128 4862
    Email: dietstudy@adelaide.edu.au (include 'SHIFT' in the email subject line)

  • Sweet taste diabetes research trial

    The Intestinal Nutrient Sensing Group aims to investigate the way sugars enter the blood (from our food), and whether these uptake pathways in the gut can be targeted in new ways to better control blood sugar.

    Our group has the following clinical studies underway, involving type 2 diabetic volunteers.

    Study 1: Investigating a novel therapy to slow glucose entry into the blood, leading to improved control of blood glucose.

    Study 2: Investigating whether diet supplementation with a combination of artificial sweeteners, affects blood glucose control.

    Eligibility requirements

    You may be eligible to take part if you are:

    • aged 28-75 years of age
    • have type 2 diabetes, managed by diet or by metformin medication alone
    • without diabetes and healthy
    • not under any dietary restrictions (you will be required to consume a beef lasagne meal).
    • To volunteer you must be willing to attend our clinic at SAHMRI and the Royal Adelaide Hospital on three separate occasions, over one month.

    Upon successful completion of the study, volunteers will receive a $200 gift voucher. This research is approved by the Royal Adelaide Hospital Ethics Committee.

    Contact details for registrations of interest

    If you would like to be involved in our research studies, please contact 8128 4863 or email sweetener@adelaide.edu.au to register your interest.

  • Genetics and environment in brain development: a twin study

    Neurodevelopmental disorders like epilepsy, intellectual disability, autism and cerebral palsy affect the way your brain develops. Since people often have more than one neurodevelopmental disorder, scientists believe that they sometimes have a common cause.

    This study invites monozygotic (identical) twins who are differently affected by one or more of these disorders to participate. We want to understand the causes of the differences in these twin pairs.

    We hope that this will help us to predict babies at risk of developing a neurodevelopmental disorder, so that doctors can more closely watch these babies develop and design better therapies or treatments for them.

    For further information and eligibility requirements, visit the Neurodevelopmental Disorder Study page.

  • Meditation and polycystic ovary syndrome

    Does meditation improve quality of life and coping in adolescents with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)?

    Women and adolescents with PCOS are more likely to have reduced quality of life and anxiety and/or mood symptoms than women without PCOS. There are no studies in girls or young women evaluating strategies like meditation to improve quality of life.

    Transcendental Meditation ® (TM) is a type of meditation that is practised sitting comfortably with eyes closed. It is taught by certified teachers. TM improves stress levels in adults, and improves school behaviour and blood pressure in children and adolescents.

    The main aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of TM on quality of life and stress in adolescent girls and young women with PCOS. The secondary aim of this study is to assess the effects of TM on cortisol (a stress hormone in the body) and blood pressure.

    Eligibility requirements

    1. Females between 12 and 22 years of age diagnosed with PCOS by a medical practitioner.
    2. Females willing and able to participate in TM instruction and practice during the study.

    A $30 honorarium will be issued to offset expenses associated with attending the study. 

    Questionnaire only part of the study 

    This additional part of the study requires females with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This aspect of the study aims to understand mood and quality of life in adolescent females with PCOS.

    Eligibility requirements:

    1. Females between 12 and 22 years old diagnosed with PCOS by a medical practitioner.
    2. Females willing to complete three questionnaires (mood, quality of life in general and in relation to PCOS).

    Contact details for registrations of interest

    For further information, or if you would like to participate, please contact:

    Dr Alexia Pena
    Phone: 8161 8134 or 0405 373 297
    Email: alexia.pena@adelaide.edu.au

  • Quality of life in healthy girls

    Quality of life and mental health are an increasingly important aspect of life. In particular, the quality of life and mental health of adolescents is important in better understanding the current situation and whether these factors differ across different populations, including those with health conditions. This study aims to find out more information about quality of life and mood in healthy adolescent girls and to compare the findings to girls who have specific health conditions, such as polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Eligibility requirements

    1. Females between 12 and 22 years old who are healthy (i.e. do not have any medical condition that requires ongoing medical follow up).
    2. Females willing to complete two questionnaires about mood and quality of life. 

    Contact details for registrations of interest

    For further information, or if you would like to participate, please contact:

    Dr Alexia Pena
    Phone: 8161 8134 or 0405 373 297
    Email: alexia.pena@adelaide.edu.au

  • Gestational diabetes and neurodevelopment

    Approximately 1 in 10 pregnant women in Australia will develop gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) during pregnancy. GDM results in hyperglycaemia and chronic inflammation, and is associated with increased risk of childhood neurodevelopmental abnormalities including attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and impairments in motor control and cognition. 

    We are performing the first study investigating the possible neurophysiological effects of GDM in 11-15 year olds, with a focus on neuroplasticity. We are also examining the ‘cortisol awakening response’, or the rapid increase in cortisol levels following awakening. Cortisol is a hormone with important functions in metabolism, stress, and brain function.

    The findings of this study will improve our understanding of the mechanisms by which GDM affects the developing brain, and will assist in the development of methods for early identification and treatment of GDM in order to prevent adverse neurodevelopment outcomes in affected children.

    We are currently recruiting a 'control group' of participants whose mothers did not have GDM during their pregnancy.

    The study involves the use of non-invasive brain stimulation techniques and collection of saliva samples. The brain stimulation techniques are safe and painless and routinely used in research.

    Eligibility requirements

    We are currently seeking participants aged 11-15 years who are to be accompanied by their mothers. Participants should be healthy with no history of neurological impairment, and mothers should not have received a diagnosis of GDM during pregnancy.

    The study involves the collection of several saliva samples (used to measure cortisol) at home over two mornings, followed by a 1.5 hour appointment at the University of Adelaide’s Robinson Research Institute, 77 King William Road, North Adelaide. We will also require some basic information about your child, including their gestational age and birth weight.

    Contact details for registrations of interest

    For further information, or if you and your child would like to participate, please contact:

    Mr Jago Van Dam
    Phone:
    08 8313 1326
    Email: jago.vandam@adelaide.edu.au

  • Brain rhythms and cognition in healthy ageing

    Advancing age is associated with a progressive decline in short-term or 'working' memory abilities. The nerve cells of the human brain are constantly sending and receiving information, generating tiny electrical signals that are often called 'brain waves' or 'brain rhythm'. These brain rhythms play an important role in human behaviour, are linked to memory processes and are thought to change with age.

    In this project, we will use advanced non-invasive brain recording techniques to investigate the role of these brain rhythms in short-term memory in both younger and older adults.

    Experiments will include questionnaires, recordings of brain activity, and memory testing. The brain recording techniques are safe and painless and routinely used in memory research.

    This study requires attendance of one session of approximately 2 hours duration at the Clinical Research Facility on level 4 of the Adelaide Health and Medical Sciences Building, North Tce. Participants will be reimbursed for their time with a $20 gift voucher.

    Eligibility requirements

    You may be eligible for this study if you:

    • are aged 18-35 or 60-80 years
    • have no history of neurological impairments or brain injury
    • are not using medications that affect neurological function (e.g. antidepressants, sedatives, antipsychotics)

    Contact details for registrations of interest

    For further information, or if you would like to participate, please contact:

    Ellen Williams
    Email: ellen.williams@adelaide.edu.au

    Lynton Graetz
    Email: lynton.graetz@adelaide.edu.au

    Dr Mitchell Goldsworthy
    Phone: (08) 8313 1323
    Email: mitchell.goldsworthy@adelaide.edu.au

  • Migraine blood rest research study

    Professors Paul Rolan and Mark Hutchinson of the Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences are undertaking a research project to see whether a new technology can be used as a blood test for the diagnosis of migraine.

    Eligibility requirements

    We are looking for both migraine patients and healthy participants for the study. During a single visit to the University of Adelaide's Adelaide Medical School on North Terrace, participants are asked to complete a questionnaire, undergo an interview, and have a 30mL blood sample taken. A gift voucher will be given to thank you for your time (less than one hour in total).

    Contact details for registrations of interest

    For further information, or if you would like to participate, email migraine_study@adelaide.edu.au.

  • Adolescents resisting the drinking culture

    Significant numbers of Australian adolescents consume alcohol, with almost two thirds of them doing so at risky levels. As a consequence, the consumption of alcohol by Australian adolescents remains a national concern. The aim of this study is to establish new insights in the social phenomenon of adolescent drinking in Australia by applying an alternative lens and exploring what influences adolescents’ decisions to abstain, refrain or consume alcohol at low risk levels.  This study is part of a PhD being conducted in the Adelaide Nursing School, with Associate Professor Lynette Cusack as the Principal Investigator and Sue Sharrad as the PhD candidate.

    As there is limited understanding of this phenomenon, this research is important for future health promotion and education strategy directions. 

    Eligibility requirements

    To be eligible for the study, participants must be male or female adolescents, aged between 14-19 years of age, and either an abstainer, or low risk consumer of alcohol or can describe experiences where they have refrained from alcohol consumption.  Study participants must be able to commit to an interview that may last one to two hours.

    Contact details for registration of interest

    Student researcher and PhD candidate Sue Sharrad at suzanne.sharrad@adelaide.edu.au or phone 0414 383 349.

    HREC Approval No: H-2016-217

  • Knee Function Study

    Help investigate ways to assess knee function following lower-leg fracture surgery.

    Eligibility requirements

    To be eligible for the study participants must:

    1. be aged between 18 and 65
    2. be able to understand written and spoken English
    3. not suffer from any existing musculoskeletal disorders associated with mobility problems or impaired functioning of the lower limbs.

    Participants will receive a $20 gift voucher. This study has been approved by the Research Ethics Committee of the Royal Adelaide Hospital. 

    More informtion and registration of interest

    For more information visit Knee Function Study

  • ENDIA - Australia's largest study into the causes of Type 1 Diabetes in childhood

    Type 1 Diabetes in children is twice as common as it was 20 years ago. To understand why, the ENDIA (Environmental Determinants of Islet Autoimmunity) Study (external link) is the world’s first to follow children from the pregnancy to determine what factors influence the development of type 1 diabetes (T1D).

    This national study aims to follow 1400 babies who have a first degree relative with T1D. The study assesses environmental exposures and how these protect from or trigger the onset of T1D. ENDIA is an observational study; there are no interventions and participation is low risk.

    Eligibility requirements

    Family members who meet the following criteria may be eligible for ENDIA:

    • Pregnant women with T1D
    • Men with T1D whose partner is pregnant
    • Pregnant women with an older child who has T1D
    • Babies less than 6 months of age who have a first degree relative with T1D.

    Contact details for registrations of interest

    To express your interest in the study contact ENDIA by email endia@adelaide.edu.au or via the website at www.endia.org.au(external link), or call our nurse coordinators directly:

    Location Contact details
    Adelaide (08) 8161 7349
    Brisbane (07) 3163 1759
    Geelong 0478 336 610
    Melbourne (03) 9342 8641
    Newcastle 0408 162 559
    Perth (08) 9340 7974
    Sydney (02) 9832 9243
    All other areas (08) 8161 8655

     

    Recruitment continues into 2018. ENDIA also has a Regional Participation Program for those living too far from ENDIA sites to be able to participate from their home.

    ENDIA is also on Facebook (external link) for regular news and updates. Please like or share our posts to spread the word!

    This study has ethical approval and current funding from JDRF Australia and the Helmsley Charitable Trust.

  • Exenatide (once weekly) trial

    Exenatide BD (also known as Byetta) is a drug that is used to manage blood sugar (glucose) levels in people with type 2 diabetes. It is widely used today and is injected twice daily. One of the ways in which Byetta works is by slowing the rate of stomach emptying and thereby reducing blood sugar levels. A once weekly preparation of exenatide (Bydureon) has now been approved for use in Australia. We plan to evaluate the effect of this medication on the rate of stomach emptying in healthy subjects. This study will provide important information relating to the mechanism of action of this drug in the management of people with type 2 diabetes.

    Eligibility requirements

    To be eligible for the study, we are looking for healthy (non-diabetic) male and female participants between 55 and 70 years of age (females must be postmenopausal), and in general good health. Study participants are required to attend the Discipline of Medicine at the Royal Adelaide Hospital once a week for the 9 week duration of the exenatide QW (Bydureon) treatments. At the beginning and end of the 9 week period, participants will have their rate of stomach emptying measured using a non-invasive technique.

    Contact details for registrations of interest

    Study co-ordinators:

    • Mrs Rachael Tippett
    • Ms Seva Hatzinikolas

    Phone: 0451 735 247
    Email: researchdiabetes@adelaide.edu.au

  • Imagination and ESP

    This study aims to find out about a particular form of extra-sensory perception (ESP) known as precognition (correctly predicting a future target photograph from a set of five before the target is selected by a random number generator).

    You will be required to complete a few questionnaires. This will be done in person at the School of Psychology. This should all take no longer than 30 to 40 minutes. Participants may also find benefit in contributing to potentially valuable psychological research, as well as gaining experience and knowledge in methods of psychological testing.

    Eligibility requirements

    In order to be eligible for participation in this study, you must be 18 years or over, and be able to speak/read English fluently.

    Contact details for registrations of interest

    Dr Lance Storm
    Text “ESP” to 0437 032 556
    Email: lance.storm@adelaide.edu.au with the subject “ESP”

    Dr Storm will respond as soon as possible with office location and available testing times.

  • MAGENTA: Magnesium sulphate at 30 to 34 weeks' gestational age: Neuroprotection trial

    Babies born very preterm have a greater risk of significant morbidities including neurologic impairments such as cerebral palsy. The risk of morbidity increases with decreasing gestational age at birth. The Cochrane review evaluating the effect of magnesium sulphate on neuroprotection of the fetus shows that magnesium sulphate given to women at risk of imminent preterm birth reduces the risk of cerebral palsy. It remains unclear at which gestational age treatment will be beneficial.

    The National Clinical Practice Guidelines on Antenatal Magnesium Sulphate prior to preterm birth of the fetus, infant and child recommends further randomised trials at 30 weeks' gestation or more. This had led to the MAGENTA Study.

    Chief Investigators:

    • Professor Caroline Crowther
    • Philippa Middleton
    • Associate Professor Dominic Wilkinson
    • Associate Professor Ross Haslam

    Clinical Trial Coordinators:

    • Pat Ashwood
    • Daniela Gagliardi
    • Michaela Jarrett

    Phone: (08) 8161 7767
    Email: magenta@adelaide.edu.au

    ACTRN12611000491965

  • Mind and brain research at SAHMRI

    If you have encountered depression, anxiety, stress or chronic fatigue in your daily life, consider contributing to research at SAHMRI (external link)

  • GLP-1 for lowering plasma glucose in patients with type 2-diabetic patients

    This study compares the effects of a gut hormone called glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), when given by either intravenous or subcutaneous infusion. We aim to provide an optimal therapeutic effect with minimal adverse consequences, by comparing different delivery methods of a glucose lowering hormone GLP-1. 

    After successfully completing the trial, a minimum of $360 is paid via EFT transfer  to participants as an honorarium for their time.

    Eligibility requirements

    To be eligible for this study, you should be:

    • diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes without any other significant illness 
    • on long acting type insulin except (degludec)
    • aged 18-79 years
    • have a 20-35kg/m2 BMI

    Contact details for registrations of interest

    For further information, or if you would like to participate, please contact:

    Michelle Bound
    Phone: (08) 8313 6676
    Email: diabetes@adelaide.edu.au

  • Can loss of response to the gut hormone, GIP, be reversed in type 2 diabetes?

    The gut hormone, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), stimulates insulin secretion after meals, lowering blood glucose but it tends to be ineffective in people with type 2 diabetes. We are using a GIP antagonist to determine whether its glucose-lowering effect can be improved when type 2 diabetes is tightly controlled by 12 weeks of the oral anti-diabetic drug, called sitagliptin. We will evaluate the effects of GIP (using the GIP antagonist) at both the beginning and end of the intervention, by the use of an intraduodenal glucose infusion.

    After successfully completing the trial, a minimum of $400 is paid via EFT transfer to participants as an honorarium for their time.

    Eligibility requirements

    To be eligible for this study, you should be:

    • diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes (diet controlled or metformin only)
    • on long acting type insulin except (degludec)
    • aged 18-79 years
    • have a 20-35kg/m2 BMI
    • NOT taking Sitagliptin (DPP-IV Inhibitor) medication

    Contact details for registrations of interest

    For further information, or if you would like to participate, please contact:

    Michelle Bound
    Phone: (08) 8313 6676
    Email: diabetes@adelaide.edu.au

  • Cognitive function across the lifespan

    Adult volunteers are needed for a research project investigating how general cognitive function changes with age. We know that many aspects of cognitive function are to some extent determined by our genetics. Genes (DNA) that affect the expression of certain chemicals and receptors in the brain influence our ability to perceive and process information in our environment, form new memories, and make decisions.

    This project will try to further refine our understanding of how our genetics influences our cognitive function across our lifespan. This project will lead to a deeper understanding of how cognitive function evolves over the course of healthy ageing, and could eventually lead to the development of a tool that could use information about an individual’s genetics to predict how their cognitive function may change over their lifespan. Importantly, this could help to identify individuals who are at risk for cognitive decline or dementia earlier, which could ultimately lead to more successful therapeutic interventions.

    What do participants have to do?

    • Complete a 30-minute online questionnaire www.borrowmybrain.org
    • Attend a face-to-face session of approximately 2.5 hours duration at our city-based laboratory, which involves:
      • A series of tests of general cognitive function (memory, vocabulary, attention)
      • A saliva sample, which will be used for DNA testing in order to determine whether genotypes that influence neurological functioning are related to cognitive function.

    (All tests are non-invasive and should cause no discomfort).

    Honorarium

    Participants will receive a $50 Coles Myer gift card on completion of the survey and laboratory visit.

    Eligibility requirements

    We are looking for healthy participants who are:

    • aged 18 years or older
    • fluent English speakers
    • not diagnosed with a neurological disorder and with no prior history of brain injury
    • not experiencing a drug or alcohol dependency, either a current or previous condition
    • not smoking more than five cigarettes per day
    • not using medication that affects neurological function (e.g., sedatives, antipsychotics)
    • not suffering from an uncorrected visual disorder
    • not diagnosed with a learning disability.

    For more information and to get started, visit www.borrowmybrain.org.

  • Cognitive function in patients with different subtypes of Parkinson’s disease

    Volunteers are needed for a research project investigating Parkinson’s subtype and cognitive function in Parkinson’s disease. This project will examine how general cognitive function differs in two different subtypes of Parkinson’s disease: tremor-dominant and akinetic-rigid. It has been shown that these two subtypes of Parkinson’s disease are associated with different cognitive outcomes, yet the reasons for this are still unclear.

    This project will try to understand how patterns of cognitive performance differ between the two subtypes of Parkinson’s disease. In addition, we will investigate whether specific genetic information could be used to predict particular patterns of cognitive performance. Importantly, this understanding may improve our ability to predict who is at risk for the development of cognitive problems in people with Parkinson’s disease. Ultimately, this may lead to more personalised and effective treatment recommendations for cognitive dysfunction in Parkinson’s disease.

    What do participants have to do?

    • Attend two 2.5-3 hours sessions, in our city-based laboratory
      In the first session, individuals will be tested while taking their normal Parkinson’s medications. In the second session, individuals will be tested after 12-24 hours of not taking Parkinson’s medications.
    • Complete an online questionnaire before attending each session.
    • Complete a series of tests of general cognitive function (memory, vocabulary, attention).
    • Provide a saliva sample, which will be used for DNA testing in order to determine whether genotypes that influence neurological functioning are related to cognitive function.

    (All tests are non-invasive and should cause no discomfort).

    Eligibility requirements

    We are looking for participants who:

    • have a diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease
    • are fluent English speakers
    • have no previous diagnosis of dementia or a learning disability.

    Honorarium

      Participants will receive a $20 gift card after each of the two in-person sessions.

      Contact details for registrations of interest

      If you are interested and would like more information, please contact us:

      Phone: (08) 8313 0012
      Email: cns_laboratory@adelaide.edu.au

    • Improving chronic disease outcomes remotely with a digital NUDGE in individuals with type 2 diabetes

      We are looking for adult volunteers to investigate how a series of electronic messages delivered via the phone can affect our eating behaviour and thereby improve glucose control in people living with type 2 diabetes.

      Participants will be required to visit the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI) in the Adelaide CBD three times over 4 weeks (less than 3 hours in total). Using a continuous glucose monitor and sleep monitor (both devices will be provided to you at no cost) – we will track your blood sugar levels and night-time sleep over a 2-week baseline period. If you are eligible for the intervention, as determined by examination of your baseline data, you will go through the same procedure for another 2 weeks whilst receiving 7 digital messages through your mobile.

      All individuals who participate in this study will receive an $80 honorarium. If you are ineligible and excluded after the baseline monitoring period at V1, or if you chose not to continue further a $40 honorarium will be provided as compensation.

      This study is not directly assessing a treatment for a disease, and as such, participants will not directly benefit from participating. However, some of the outcomes we measure (such as blood glucose and sleep parameters) may be indicators of your health. If these measures are outside of the normal ranges, you will be notified and provided with the relevant information to take to your GP for further evaluation.

      At the end of the study, participants will be invited to return for an information evening where we will tell participants about the outcomes of the research. The outcomes of the study represents potential benefit to the community and potentially this proposal offers the novel opportunity to optimise glycaemic control in patients with T2DM.

      Eligibility requirements

      You may be eligible to participate in this study if you:

      • are aged 18 to 75 years
      • have type 2 diabetes and managing it without insulin and/or sulfonylureas
      • own a smart mobile phone
      • are willing to provide a proof of having been vaccinated against COVID-19
      • are willing to provide the consent form to participate in the trial

      Contact details for registrations of interest

      For further information, or if you would like to participate, please contact:

      Dr Lijun Zhao
      Email: nudge@adelaide.edu.au

    • The Adelaide Pain and Plasticity Study (APPs)

      This research project is about understanding the extent of brain adaptation (plasticity) in regions of the brain related to pain processing. This knowledge is critical to understanding the processes that result in pain and holds the promise of identifying new and effect treatment targets. Our objective is to use non-invasive brain imaging, stimulation and recording techniques to determine the role of brain changes in persistent low back pain. We hope to identify areas of brain adaptation that may respond to restorative brain stimulation techniques in future studies.

      Participants will receive an honorarium of $80 for completion of the study.

      This study will require attendance of up to four sessions of approximately 1-3 hours each at the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI, level 4) and Clinical Research and Imaging Centre (North Pod of SAHMRI) – Adelaide CBD.

      There are three sessions before the opt in for clinical trial (only for those with back pain) and we can provide $20 gift vouchers at the end of the first two sessions, and then $40 gift card on completion. There is no cost to the participant for an MRI of the head or for the recovery coach trial should they opt in, but there is also no remuneration for the recovery coach part. 

      This study is categorised as low risk and has been approved by the Human Research Ethics Committee at the University of Adelaide.

      Eligibility requirements

      You may be eligible to participate in this study if you:

      • are aged 18-80 years
      • live in Adelaide
      • have lower back pain
      • have an interest in brain function

      Contact details for registrations of interest

      For further information, or if you would like to participate, please contact:

      Dr Carolyn Berryman
      Phone: (08) 83131305
      Email:
      carolyn.berryman@adelaide.edu.au 

    • Assessing how concussion effects the brain

      Concussions are extremely common injuries and are increasingly recognised to cause significant ongoing side effects in a large proportion of patients. However, the changes within the brain that drive the side effects of injury are not well understood. This project will use safe and non-invasive techniques to further investigate how brain function is altered after a concussion, and how changes in the brain drive side effects of injury.

      To participate, we require people who have experienced a concussion within the past 24 months.

      Participants will receive an honorarium of $45 per session. This study will require attendance of up to two sessions.

      This study has been approved by the Human Research Ethics Committee at the University of Adelaide.

      Eligibility requirements

      You may be eligible to participate in this study if you:

      • have experienced a concussion within the past 24 months 
      • are aged 18 – 60 years

      Contact details for registrations of interest

      For further information, or if you would like to participate, please contact:

      Dr George Opie
      Phone: (08) 83134157
      Email: george.opie@adelaide.edu.au

    • Tailoring chronic pain assessment to children and young people with cerebral palsy

      This research project is finding out information on how we should measure ongoing pain in children and young people with cerebral palsy. We know that chronic pain affects many areas of life such as typical daily activities, exercise, mental health and sleep. We also know that many children and young people with cerebral palsy have ongoing pain, but it is not often treated. We think this might be because appropriate pain assessment tools are not available or widely used. We want to know which chronic pain assessment tools are most meaningful and appropriate. We also want to know how we could modify these tools so they are more relevant for people with cerebral palsy.

      We plan to survey people with cerebral palsy, parents of children with cerebral palsy, health professionals and researchers. We will also be running small group and individual interviews. We will use this information to modify existing chronic pain assessment tools so that they are more relevant to children and young people with cerebral palsy

      For participation in the small group of individual interviews (30-60 mins), you will receive a $50 gift voucher

      Eligibility requirements

      • Individuals with a diagnosis of cerebral palsy (>8 years of age), all motor types and all GMFCS levels
      • Parents/caregivers of children (>2 years of age) with cerebral palsy
      • Medical, Nursing and Allied Health clinicians and clinician researchers with >5 years experience assessing and treating cerebral palsy
      • Able to communicate verbally or with a communication device in a focus group setting

      Contact details for registration of interest

      To express your interest or access further information, please complete the eligibility check or email Meredith Smith: meredith.smith@adelaide.edu.au

    • calOries plus tiMe restrIcTion to alter biomarkers of aging and type 2 diabetes (OMIT)

      We are looking for volunteers to take part in a study about comparing diets that restrict the amount of food that is eaten, with diets that also restrict the time that food is eaten, on risk factors for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases over 2 months.

      Participation in this study will involve 3 short visits (1 hour) to the clinical research facility at South Australian Health & Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI) and 2 overnight visits (28 hours) to the Sleep Lab of UniSA at the Magill campus over 3.5 months, as well as regular contact with researchers by phone.

      Participants will receive a $1200 honorarium for their participation in the study.

      Eligibility requirements

      You may be eligible to participate in this study if you are:

      • aged between 35 and 75 years
      • have a BMI greater than 25 kg/m2 but less than 45 kg/m2

      Contact details to register your interest

      Check your eligibility and participate to the study

      For further information please contact the research team by email: omit@adelaide.edu.au.

      If you would prefer to contact us by phone first, please call 8128 4862 and leave a message with your name and phone number. A researcher will call you back to discuss the study with you and answer any questions you may have.

    • Financial incentives for helping pregnant women to quit smoking – pilot trial

      International studies have shown that financial incentives have helped pregnant women to quit smoking during their pregnancies. This study seeks to discover whether offering financial incentives to pregnant Australian women may help them to stop smoking.

      Participants will be required to attend two interviews of approximately 20-30 minutes, spaced 4 weeks apart. These sessions can be held at Lyell McEwin Hospital (LMH) or at a local community space close to the participant’s location.

      In the first interview, you will be asked to complete a short questionnaire (approximately five minutes) about your history of pregnancy and smoking. After this, you will be asked questions about receiving financial incentives to quit smoking during pregnancy. These answers will be audio-recorded. You will then be asked to hold your breath for 15 seconds and breathe into a carbon monoxide (CO) monitor. The CO monitor will calculate the CO levels in your blood to confirm that you smoke. The CO monitor uses single-use mouthpieces that are hygienically wrapped. At this time, you will be provided with information about available mental health supports and quitting methods you can use in pregnancy.

      After 4 weeks, you will be required to attend a follow-up interview to answer further questions and blow into the CO monitor again. If the result of the CO monitor indicates that your CO levels are equal or lower than 4ppm (indicating that you have successfully quit smoking), you will be given a $100 gift voucher. If you have continued to smoke and your CO monitor reading is above 5ppm, you will receive a $50 gift voucher for your time and participation. Please note, if you have quit smoking, but have been around people who smoke, this could affect the reading of the CO monitor.

      Eligibility requirements

      You may be eligible to participate in this study if you:

      • Are currently pregnant and smoke tobacco
      • Are aged 18 years or over
      • Can communicate in English without difficulty
      • Live in a metropolitan location in Adelaide
      • Are willing and able to give informed consent for participation in the study

      Contact details for registrations of interest

      For further information, or if you would like to participate, please contact:

      Cherise Fletcher
      Phone: 0466 458 274
      Email: cherise.fletcher@adelaide.edu.au

    • Social Media Psychoeducation Study

      This study is looking for participants to participate in an online experimental study focusing on social media psychoeducation with the opportunity to win a $40 voucher.

      You can participate in an online study to assess the outcomes of social media psychoeducational videos. Participation will involve completing online surveys and watching a brief video, as well as using Instagram for a period of time, using your personal account. You will also be sent a brief follow-up survey three days later. To thank you for your participation in both surveys you can enter a drawer to win a $40 Coles/Myer.


      Eligibility requirements

      You may be eligible to participate in this study if you:

      • are aged 16 years and over
      • fluent in English
      • have access to an Instagram account

      Contact details for registrations of interest

      If you are interested in participating in our study, please access via the link:
      https://adelaideunisop.syd1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_bJzFeaf4THRyqxM

      For further information, or if you would like to participate, please contact:

      Zoe Herriman
      Email: zoe.herriman@adelaide.edu.au

    • Functional Significance of the Pyramidalis Muscle

      This collaborative research is being undertaken by the Gastrointestinal & Enteric Neuroscience and the Bone and Joint Osteoimmunology research groups in conjunction with industry partner Jones Radiology.

      This research aims to investigate the potential functional role(s) of a commonly unknown abdominal muscle that some regard as vestigial (serving no purpose) – the pyramidalis muscle.

      Taking part in this research involves participating in three studies, namely, shear-wave elastography, electromyography and force strain gauge.

      Shear-wave elastography
      Shear-wave elastography is a widely accepted medical ultrasound technology used to measure tissue density / “stiffness”. This research will use shear-wave elastography to measure tissue specific “stiffness” in the abdominal wall during non-strenuous movements, as a hypothesized functional role of the pyramidalis muscle.

      Electromyography
      Electromyography is a commonly used methodology designed to record muscle activity (contraction). This research project will use electromyography to measure pyramidalis muscle activity during non-strenuous functional movements of the trunk e.g., bending down to touch your toes (flexion), leaning backwards/arching your back (extension), side bending (lateral flexion) and twisting (rotation).

      Force Strain Gauge
      Force strain gauge is technology designed to measure magnitudes of force (i.e., how strong you are!). This project will use a force strain gauge machine to measure the amount of force you can produce during a trunk rotation movement (twisting your torso from one side to the other).

      Additional Study Measure: Brief Pain Questionnaire (i.e., the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI))
      Throughout this study you will be asked to complete a Brief Pain Inventory (BPI). The BPI is used to record the level of participant comfort and discomfort.

      Acknowledgment of Appreciation
      Upon completion of all three studies, participants will receive a $40 honorarium in the form of a gift voucher.

      Eligibility Criteria
      You may be eligible to participate in this research project if you:

      • Have no previous medical history of abdominal surgery or abnormality, e.g. hernia, caesarean section, appendix/gallbladder removal.
      • Have a BMI <30

      Ethics
      This study has been approved by Human Research Ethics Committee (H-2022-139)

      Contact details for registrations of interest
      For further information, or if you would like to participate, please register your interest by clicking the box below or contact the research team directly:
      Email: craig.short@adelaide.edu.au