Skip to main content

Participate in Research

Would you like to be a part of ground breaking medical research? Researchers in our faculty frequently undertake clinical trials to test new medical treatments and interventions. Your participation is crucial to improving the health of our population. Explore our currently enrolling trials below.

What is a clinical trial, and why do we need them?

Clinical trials are research studies that involve human volunteers who are assigned to one or more health-related interventions to evaluate the effects on health outcomes. Clinical trials are essential for the development of new medical treatments and interventions. They are used to determine if a new intervention works, if it is safe, and whether or not it is an improvement on currently available treatments.

The following trials are currently seeking participants:

The brain and cognitive control research

The goal-directed (or “top-down”) control of thoughts and behaviour is fundamental for everyday life. An example of this is in learning and memory, during which suppression of task-irrelevant distracting information is essential. The nerve cells of the human brain are constantly sending and receiving information, generating tiny electrical signals that are often called “brain waves” or “brain rhythms”. These brain rhythms play an important role in human behaviour, and have been linked to the protection of memory processes against distracters.

In this project, we will use advanced non-invasive brain stimulation and recording techniques to investigate the role of these brain rhythms in top-down control of brain activity in memory. We will also examine how these brain processes are affected by healthy ageing.

Experiments will include questionnaires, recordings of brain activity, brain stimulation, and memory testing. The brain recording and stimulation techniques are safe and painless and routinely used in movement and learning research.

Eligibility requirements

We are currently seeking healthy, right-handed adults aged 18-35 or 50-80 years with no history of neurological impairments or brain injury, and who are not using medications that affect neurological function (e.g. antidepressants, sedatives, antipsychotics).

This study requires attendance of one session of approximately 2–3 hours duration at the University of Adelaide’s Robinson Research Institute, 77 King William Road, North Adelaide. Participants will be reimbursed for their time with a $20 gift voucher.

Contact details for registrations of interest

For further information, or if you would like to participate, please contact:

Mr Lynton Graetz
Email: lynton.graetz@adelaide.edu.au

Telephone: 8313 1308

Dr Mitchell Goldsworthy
Email: mitchell.goldsworthy@adelaide.edu.au
Telephone: 8313 1323

Migraine blood test research study

Professors Paul Rolan and Mark Hutchinson of the Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences are undertaking a research project to see whether a new technology can be used as a blood test for the diagnosis of migraine.

Eligibility requirements

We are looking for both migraine patients and healthy participants for the study. During a single visit to the University of Adelaide's Adelaide Medical School on North Terrace, participants are asked to complete a questionnaire, undergo an interview, and have a 30mL blood sample taken. A gift voucher will be given to thank you for your time (less than one hour in total).

Contact details for registrations of interest

For further information, or if you would like to participate, email migraine_study@adelaide.edu.au.

Sweet taste diabetes research trial

Our aim is to investigate the way sugars enter the blood (from our food), and whether these uptake pathways in the gut can be targeted in new ways to better control blood sugar.

Our group has the following clinical studies underway, involving type 2 diabetic volunteers:

Study 1: Investigating a novel therapy to slow glucose entry into the blood, leading to improved control of blood glucose.
Study 2: Investigating whether diet supplementation with a combination of artificial sweeteners, affects blood glucose control.

Eligibility requirements

To be eligible for the study, we are looking for healthy (non-diabetic) and type 2 diabetic male and female participants between 20 and 75 years of age (females must be postmenopausal), and in general good health. Those with type 2 diabetes must have their diabetes managed by diet or by metformin medication.

Contact details for registrations of interest

If you’d like to be involved in our research studies, register your interest with Nicole on 8128 4863 or taste_gut@adelaide.edu.au.

T4NIBs study: Is there an intensity threshold for response to non-invasive brain stimulation?

Non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBs) comprises a weak electrical current applied via two scalp electrodes to a specific brain region, which results in either an increase or a decrease in cortical activity. NIBs is used clinically in conditions such as stroke to promote recovery. As yet, there is no standard protocol for the intensity or duration of therapeutic application, and the outcomes vary considerably.

Using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to excite the motor cortex, our aim is to determine whether there is a threshold intensity for brain response. Specifically, we will test the response of the motor cortex to tDCS using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), technology that uses a powerful magnetic field to induce electrical activity in excitable tissues.  If the tDCS increases the excitability of the brain, then we will see that the size of the thumb twitch we can also evoke using TMS will increase.

There is no pain involved in this study and we are recruiting now.

Eligibility requirements

To be eligible for this study, participants must be between 18 and 50 years old, consider themselves to be healthy and have no history of any neurological, chronic pain or mental health disorders.

Participants must be willing to attend the NeuroPAD research laboratory in the Norwich Building, at 77 King William Rd, North Adelaide. The study consists of three sessions at about the same time of day and at least a week apart. An honourarium of $60 in ColesMyer vouchers is offered at the end of the third session.

Contact details for registration of interest

Study coordinator and chief investigator Dr Carolyn Berryman, carolyn.berryman@adelaide.edu.au, telephone 0419 817 494.

Body representation in fibromyalgia

This project aims to investigate whether and to what extent body signals, specifically upper limb signals are altered in people with fibromyalgia (FM). Over one session, we will use three simple tasks to assess body signals:

  • Hand laterality judgement task: measuring the time it takes and the accuracy to determine whether you are looking at a left or a right hand from a series of photographs.
  • Body scale judgement task: watch a computer screen with an image of a growing or shrinking circle and press a key to stop the movement when you think that your hand would fit through the circle.
  • Precision grip lift task: lift a small piece of machinery that will measure the grip force and acceleration of the lift to a height of 10 cm several times.

Eligibility requirements

To be eligible for the study, participants must be between 18 and 75 years of age, and have a current history of FM, or consider themselves healthy with no current history of pain or neurological disorders of the upper limb, or FM.

Participants must be willing to attend the NeuroPAD research laboratory in the Norwich Building, at 77 King William Rd, North Adelaide for one session lasting approximately one hour.

This study is running between August and October 2018. Participants will be reimbursed with a $20 ColesMyer voucher for their time.

Contact details for registrations of interest

Study coordinator and chief investigator Dr Carolyn Berryman, carolyn.berryman@adelaide.edu.au, telephone 0419 817 494.

Adolescents resisting the drinking culture

Significant numbers of Australian adolescents consume alcohol, with almost two thirds of them doing so at risky levels. As a consequence, the consumption of alcohol by Australian adolescents remains a national concern. The aim of this study is to establish new insights in the social phenomenon of adolescent drinking in Australia by applying an alternative lens and exploring what influences adolescents’ decisions to abstain, refrain or consume alcohol at low risk levels.  This study is part of a PhD being conducted in the Adelaide Nursing School, with Associate Professor Lynette Cusack as the Principal Investigator and Sue Sharrad as the PhD candidate.

As there is limited understanding of this phenomenon, this research is important for future health promotion and education strategy directions. 

Eligibility requirements

To be eligible for the study, participants must be male or female adolescents, aged between 14-19 years of age, and either an abstainer, or low risk consumer of alcohol or can describe experiences where they have refrained from alcohol consumption.  Study participants must be able to commit to an interview that may last one to two hours.

Contact details for registration of interest

Student researcher and PhD candidate Sue Sharrad at suzanne.sharrad@adelaide.edu.au or phone 0414 383 349.

HREC Approval No: H-2016-217

Bending and Lifting Study

The Adelaide Centre for Spinal Research (SA Pathology), UniSA and the University of Adelaide, seeks 30-70 year-old male and female volunteers to participate in a study investigating methods of bending and lifting light weights (less than 10kg).

Eligibility requirements

Individuals in two categories are invited to participate in this study:

  1. Individuals in good health without persistent back pain
  2. Individuals with persistent low back pain for at least three months

Participants will receive a $50 gift voucher. This study has been approved by the Research Ethics Committee of the Royal Adelaide Hospital. 

Contact details for registrations of interest

If you would like to find out more about this study, please email: erica.beaucage-gauvreau@adelaide.edu.au or call: 0478 753 014.

Cognitive and Functional Assessment of Psychosis Staging Study (CoFAPSS)

Cognitive and Functional Assessment of Psychosis Staging Study (CoFAPSS) is a South Australian multicentre study of the impact of psychotic illness on symptoms, cognitive (thinking) and general function. Our aim is to identify key predictors of good or poor function that can be used to help select the best treatments as early as possible in a person’s illness to produce the best outcome.

Eligibility requirements

To be eligible for the study, participants must be 16 to 65 years of age and have a past or current history of symptoms of psychotic illness. We are also interested in assessing control subjects with no history of psychosis and / or family members of patients with psychosis.

Study participants would need to attend one of the Discipline of Psychiatry sites at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital or the new Adelaide Health and Medical Sciences building on North Terrace, Adelaide. 

Contact details for registrations of interest

Study co-ordinator Dr Scott Clark at research.psychiatry@adelaide.edu.au

Cognitive Function and Mood Study (CoFaMS)

The Cognitive Function and Mood Study investigates the effects of depression and anxiety on psychosocial, workplace and day-to-day function also including cognitive function (for example concentration, memory, and attention). To do this, study participants complete questionnaires, a clinical interview, and a series of game-like computer based activities. The study is run by the Discipline of Psychiatry, with Professor Bernhard Baune as the Principal Investigator.

Eligibility requirements

To be eligible for the study, participants must be aged 18 years of age or over. Study participants can have current or past anxiety, depression, or bipolar disorder. Study participants are also welcome to be considered for the study if they are healthy people without a history of mental health problems.   

Contact details for registrations of interest

Study co-ordinator, Dr Natalie Mills, at research.psychiatry@adelaide.edu.au 

ENDIA - Australia's largest study into the causes of Type 1 Diabetes in childhood

Type 1 Diabetes in children is twice as common as it was 20 years ago. To understand why, the ENDIA (Environmental Determinants of Islet Autoimmunity) Study is the world’s first to follow children from the pregnancy to determine what factors influence the development of type 1 diabetes (T1D).

This national study aims to follow 1400 babies who have a first degree relative with T1D. The study assesses environmental exposures and how these protect from or trigger the onset of T1D. ENDIA is an observational study; there are no interventions and participation is low risk.

Eligibility requirements

Family members who meet the following criteria may be eligible for ENDIA:

  • Pregnant women with T1D
  • Men with T1D whose partner is pregnant
  • Pregnant women with an older child who has T1D
  • Babies less than 6 months of age who have a first degree relative with T1D.

Contact details for registrations of interest

To express your interest in the study contact ENDIA by email endia@adelaide.edu.au or via the website at www.endia.org.au, or call our nurse coordinators directly: Adelaide - (08) 8161 7349; Brisbane – (07) 3163 1759; Geelong – 0478 336 610; Melbourne – (03) 9342 8641; Newcastle – 0408 162 559; Perth – (08) 9340 7974; Sydney – (02) 9832 9243; ALL OTHER AREAS – (08) 8161 8655.

Recruitment continues into 2018. ENDIA also has a Regional Participation Program for those living too far from ENDIA sites to be able to participate from their home.

ENDIA is also on Facebook for regular news and updates. Please like or share our posts to spread the word!

This study has ethical approval and current funding from JDRF Australia and the Helmsley Charitable Trust.

Exenatide (once weekly) trial

Exenatide BD (also known as Byetta) is a drug that is used to manage blood sugar (glucose) levels in people with type 2 diabetes. It is widely used today and is injected twice daily. One of the ways in which Byetta works is by slowing the rate of stomach emptying and thereby reducing blood sugar levels. A once weekly preparation of exenatide (Bydureon) has now been approved for use in Australia. We plan to evaluate the effect of this medication on the rate of stomach emptying in healthy subjects. This study will provide important information relating to the mechanism of action of this drug in the management of people with type 2 diabetes.

Eligibility requirements

To be eligible for the study, we are looking for healthy (non-diabetic) male and female participants between 55 and 70 years of age (females must be postmenopausal), and in general good health. Study participants are required to attend the Discipline of Medicine at the Royal Adelaide Hospital once a week for the 9 week duration of the exenatide QW (Bydureon) treatments. At the beginning and end of the 9 week period, participants will have their rate of stomach emptying measured using a non-invasive technique.

Contact details for registrations of interest

Study co-ordinators: Mrs Rachael Tippett and Ms Seva Hatzinikolas. Phone 0451 735 247 or email researchdiabetes@adelaide.edu.au

Imagination and ESP

This study aims to find out about a particular form of extra-sensory perception (ESP) known as precognition (correctly predicting a future target photograph from a set of five before the target is selected by a random number generator).

You will be required to complete a few questionnaires. This will be done in person at the School of Psychology. This should all take no longer than 30 to 40 minutes. Participants may also find benefit in contributing to potentially valuable psychological research, as well as gaining experience and knowledge in methods of psychological testing.

Eligibility requirements

In order to be eligible for participation in this study, you must be 18 years or over, and be able to speak/read English fluently.

Contact details for registrations of interest

Dr Lance Storm
Text “ESP” to 0437 032 556
Email lance.storm@adelaide.edu.au with the subject “ESP”

Dr Storm will respond as soon as possible with office location and available testing times.

MAGENTA: Magnesium sulphate at 30 to 34 weeks' gestational Age: Neuroprotection Trial

Babies born very preterm have a greater risk of significant morbidities including neurologic impairments such as cerebral palsy. The risk of morbidity increases with decreasing gestational age at birth. The Cochrane review evaluating the effect of magnesium sulphate on neuroprotection of the fetus shows that magnesium sulphate given to women at risk of imminent preterm birth reduces the risk of cerebral palsy. It remains unclear at which gestational age treatment will be beneficial.

The National Clinical Practice Guidelines on Antenatal Magnesium Sulphate prior to preterm birth of the fetus, infant and child recommends further randomised trials at 30 weeks' gestation or more. This had led to the MAGENTA Study.

Chief Investigators: Professor Caroline Crowther, Philippa Middleton, Associate Professor Dominic Wilkinson, Associate Professor Ross Haslam

Clinical Trial Coordinator: Pat Ashwood, Daniela Gagliardi, Michaela Jarrett

Email: magenta@adelaide.edu.au

Phone:+61 8 8161 7767

ACTRN12611000491965

Mind and Brain Research at SAHMRI

If you have encountered depression, anxiety, stress or chronic fatigue in your daily life, consider contributing to research at SAHMRI

Pancreatic Enzyme Replacement Therapy (PERT) trial

The pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) trial is a short-term study investigating the impact of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy in type 2 diabetic patients with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. The trial is conducted within the Discipline of Medicine at the University of Adelaide, with Dr. Liza Phillips as the Principal Investigator.

Recent literature has shown that the prevalence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency exists in up to 1 in 5 patients with type 2 diabetes. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency may lead to an inappropriate rise in blood glucose levels after a meal and it is proposed that pancreatic enzyme replacement medication may offset this effect. This trial aims to prove and characterise this phenomenon.

Eligibility requirements

To be eligible for the study, participants must have type 2 diabetes and be between 40-80 years of age. Participants cannot be on exenatide (Byetta) for this trial. Participants must be willing to provide a faecal sample and attend the Discipline of Medicine for a short screening visit and then, if eligible, for two study days that last 7 hours each day. Those who complete the two study days will be reimbursed $18/hour for their time.

Contact details for registrations of interest

Study co-ordinator Dr Liza Phillips at diabetes_pert@adelaide.edu.au or (08) 8222 2915.

The PREDDICT Study - Treatment of inflammation associated depression

The PREDDICT study investigates the addition of anti-inflammatory medication to usual antidepressant treatment for depression. The study is run by the Discipline of Psychiatry, with Professor Bernhard Baune as the Principal Investigator.

Antidepressant medication has therapeutic efficacy only in approximately one third of patients with depression. In addition, blood levels of inflammatory markers have been found to be mildly elevated in some people with depression. This study will investigate, by measuring inflammatory markers in the blood and correlating these with depression symptoms, the effects of a combined treatment of depression with anti-inflammatory medication and novel antidepressant medication.

Eligibility requirements

To be eligible for the study, participants must be aged between 18-65 years of age, with current Major Depressive Disorder. Study participants would attend the Discipline of Psychiatry at the Clinical Research Facility, in the Adelaide Health and Medical Sciences Building on North Terrace.

Contact details for registrations of interest

Dr Celia Fourrier at research.psychiatry@adelaide.edu.au

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Electrophysiology in Mood And Psychosis Study

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) and Electrophysiology in Mood And Psychosis Study (TEMAPS) is a South Australian multicentre study of the links between brainwave plasticity as measured by electroencephalography (EEG) in response to TMS and cognitive and general function in healthy controls in comparison to people with a history of mental illness (depression, bipolar, schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder). Our aim is to identify TMS/EEG markers of good or poor function that can be used to help select the best treatments as early as possible in a person’s illness to produce the best outcome.

Eligibility requirements

To be eligible for the study, participants must be 18 to 65 years of age and have a past or current history of symptoms of a mood (depression or bipolar) or psychotic (schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder) illness. We are also interested in assessing control subjects with no history of mental illness.

Study participants would need to attend the Discipline of Psychiatry at Adelaide Health and Medical Sciences building on North Terrace, Adelaide and or the Robinson Research Institute on King William Road, North Adelaide.

Contact details for registrations of interest

Study co-ordinator Dr Scott Clark at research.psychiatry@adelaide.edu.au

top