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Population Research and Outcome Studies
SAHMRI
Level 7
North Terrace
ADELAIDE
SA 5000
AUSTRALIA
Email pros@adelaide.edu.au

Telephone: (08) 8313 1214
Fax: (08) 8313 1228

Population Research and Outcome Studies (PROS)

Background | Objectives | The importance of monitoring and surveillance

Background

Population Research and Outcome Studies (PROS) provides information on health status, related risk factors, behaviours, determinants and satisfaction with health services among the South Australian population.

PROS provides high quality population health information to contribute to the improvement of health and wellbeing outcomes of the South Australian population. The core business of PROS is the monitoring and surveillance of population health and chronic disease epidemiology.

Epidemiology, the primary science of public health, is concerned with the monitoring and surveillance of the distribution and determinants of health and disease in human populations. Information obtained from population health surveys is used to inform policy, programs and health services that will promote the health and well being of the South Australian population.

In January 2011 PROS transferred from SA Health to the University of Adelaide; PROS is now located within the School of Medicine, the Faculty of Health Sciences.  Most of the reports, publications and presentations detailed on these webpages were undertaken while PROS was situated in SA Health.


Objectives

PROS aim to:

  • Provide the best available epidemiological evidence on the impact of, and outcomes relating to, both established and emerging relevant health and well being priorities. This is achieved through the generation of relevant, timely and reliable population information.
  • Provide the best available epidemiological information on priority chronic diseases/conditions and their determinants.
  • Disseminate information to stakeholders across divisions, regions, portfolio service units and relevant external agencies through networks, partnerships, teamwork, and cross-divisional collaborations.


The importance of monitoring & surveillance

The changing patterns of health and illness, for example the increasing prevalence of chronic diseases and the ageing of the population, place powerful demands on the health system. The need to understand the variance in disease between different population groups and the aetiologies of chronic conditions, including socio-behavioural risk factors and social determinants, for development of appropriate health system responses, drives the need for population monitoring and surveillance.
 
The new pattern of disease that is emerging around the world is increasing the prevalence of chronic disease. This is accompanied by a demographic shift to an older population with increasing urbanisation. The changing health pattern associated with these demographic changes is staggering in its implications. It points to the fact that large numbers of the population will suffer their chronic disease in old age and place powerful demands on the health system.
 
Most chronic conditions are determined by socio-behavioural risk factors and social determinants, and it is the need to understand these aetiologies and develop appropriate health system responses that drives the need for population monitoring and surveillance systems.  


News

Incontinence takes mental toll on younger women

New research from the University of Adelaide shows middle-aged women are more likely to suffer depression from a common medical problem that they find too embarrassing to talk about: urinary incontinence.

However, help is available for women if they seek medical advice, researchers say.

In a study of the experiences of women with urinary incontinence, researcher Jodie Avery found that middle-aged women with incontinence (aged 43-65) were more likely to be depressed than older women (aged 65-89). [Full Story]

 

Please take a look at the latest PROSpective newsletter (produced biannually in June and December) to see what's going on at PROS. Latest issue; December 2012.

 


 

Data sources

PROS uses a variety of survey vehicles and methodologies to obtain data on the health of South Australians. Further information on these population data sources can be found at the following links