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Research Projects

The Institute identifies feasible, appropriate, meaningful and effective health care practices and health care outcomes by facilitating international collaboration.

Current research projects

  • Metformin and risk of Alzheimer's disease: a systematic review and meta-analysisFebruary 2017 – October 2017

    Funding organisation: National Medical Program (The Mason Foundation)
    Investigators: Dr Jared Campbell

    Dr Jared Campbell is undertaking a project entitled “Metformin and risk of Alzheimer's disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.” It is funded by the Mason Foundation and aims to investigate evidence that the common diabetic medication metformin could have an effect on dementia incidence and progression.

  • End-user and implementer experiences of Mhealth technologies for non-communicable chronic disease management in a young adult population: a systematic reviewFebruary 2017 – September 2017

    Funding organisations: Arthritis and Osteoporosis Victoria, Arthritis and Osteoporosis Western Australia and the School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Curtin University
    Investigators: Associate Professor Helen Slater (Curtin University), Dr Jared Campbell and Dr Matthew Stephenson

    Dr Jared Campbell is undertaking a consultancy with Associate Professor Helen Slater of the School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science to carry out a systematic review on “End-user and implementer experiences of Mhealth technologies for non-communicable chronic disease management in a young adult population.” It is funded by grant co-funding awarded from Move: muscle, bone and joint health, and Arthritis and Osteoporosis Western Australia and in kind support from the School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Curtin University.

  • The COSTIL Study: Core Outcomes in Stillbirth TrialsJune 2016 – December 2017

    Funding organisation: Stillbirth Foundation Australia
    Investigators: Professor Ben Mol (Paediatrics and Reproductive Health, University of Adelaide), Ms Bobae Kim, Associate Professor Edoardo Aromataris

    Stillbirth is perhaps the most devastating of all serious complications of pregnancy. Clinical studies evaluating diagnostic and therapeutic interventions to prevent stillbirth have reported many different outcomes and outcome measures. This variation hinders efforts to compare, contrast, and combine the results of individual trials, limiting the usefulness of research to inform clinical practice. The objective of this project is to develop a core outcome set to help address these issues.

    In this current project, potential outcomes will be identified through a comprehensive literature review and semi-structured interviews with patients. Diverse stakeholders, including healthcare professionals, researchers, and patients will be invited to participate in an international, multi-perspective Delphi survey to work towards consensus on potential core outcomes and how they should be measured.

  • Centre of Research Excellence in Aboriginal Chronic Disease Knowledge Translation and Exchange (CREATE)October 2013 – October 2018

    Funding organisation: NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence, Australia
    JBI Investigators: Associate Professor Edoardo Aromataris, CID; Associate Professor Craig Lockwood, AI; Associate Professor Zachary Munn, AI; Mr Sandeep Moola, AI; Mrs Alexa McArthur, AI; Dr Matthew Stephenson, AI; Dr Catalin Tufanaru, AI.

    In collaboration with the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI), National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) and School of Public Health (SPH), University of Adelaide.

    External Collaborators: Professor Alex Brown, Centre Director, CIA (SAHMRI); Professor Annette Braunack-Mayer, CIB (SPH); Professor Ngiare Brown, CIC (NACCHO/SAHMRI); Dr Carol Davy, Senior Research Fellow (SAHMRI); Dr Judith Streak Gomersall, Research Fellow (SPH); Dr Karla Canuto, Research Fellow (SAHMRI/Apunipima); Mr Stephen Harfield, Research Fellow (NACCHO); Dr Odette Gibson, AI (SAHMRI); Ms Elaine Kite, AI (SAHMRI); Ms Kim Morey, AI (SAHMRI); Mr Justin Canuto (SAHMRI); Mr Harold Stewart (SAHMRI); Ms Renee Williams, AI (NACCHO/Apunipima); Dr Drew Carter, AI (SPH).

Research funding awarded and completed in 2016

  • Metformin and risk of Alzheimer's disease: a systematic review and meta-analysisFebruary 2017 – October 2017

    Funding organisation: National Medical Program (The Mason Foundation))
    Investigators: Dr Jared Campbell

    Dr Jared Campbell is undertaking a project entitled “Metformin and risk of Alzheimer's disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.” It is funded by the Mason Foundation and aims to investigate evidence that the common diabetic medication metformin could have an effect on dementia incidence and progression.

  • The impact of integrated care on hospital and emergency department utilisation and patient-reported outcomes – a Rapid ReviewAugust 2016 – September 2016

    Funding organisation: New South Wales Ministry of Health, Australia
    Investigators: Dr Matthew Stephenson, Dr Cindy Stern, Dr Karolina Lisy, Associate Professor Edoardo Aromataris

    The focus of the review was on integrated care for people with chronic conditions. In total, the review identified and included 25 relevant systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Integrated care was generally found to have positive benefits on patient-reported outcomes, including patient satisfaction, quality of life, empowerment, self-efficacy, and health literacy. In terms of health service utilisation measures, some systematic reviews reported improvements with integrated care while others showed no difference when compared to usual care. Overall, the evidence suggests that integrated care may reduce the risk of hospital admissions and re-admissions, but has limited influence on emergency department presentations and mortality. Length of stay was reduced with integrated care for patients with some chronic diseases. The information presented in the review will assist in monitoring and benchmarking integrated care initiatives in New South Wales, Australia.

  • Priority Partner Grant – Health Consumer Engagement in the Development of Evidence-Based Resources for Nutritional Screening and Prehabilitation for Colorectal CancerAugust 2016 – December 2016

    Funding Organisation: University of Adelaide: Global Engagement Office
    Investigator: Dr Micah Peters

    The objective of this project was to develop stronger partnerships between researchers at the University of Adelaide and the University of Nottingham to improve consumer-engagement in the process of developing evidence-based resources for people affected by colorectal cancer.

    Consumer engagement is an important but not consistently implemented aspect of evidence-based health care. There is strong evidence that people affected by cancer can benefit from information around what they can do to improve their likelihood of responding well to treatment and surviving cancer. Many people who have been affected by cancer have identified that currently, the information and advice provided by healthcare professionals is not useful or does not meet their needs (such as diet, exercise, and emotional support). Further, in South Australia, engaging consumers in the planning and development of relevant resources is not yet well done. This small grant was used to initiate new partnerships between researchers at the University of Adelaide and the University of Nottingham to work together to improve consumer-engagement in the process of developing evidence-based resources for people affected by colorectal cancer. Having supported capacity developments in evidence synthesis and improved understanding of issues facing health consumers, the project team are now scoping opportunities for securing funding to underpin further work in the area of multi-modal prehabilitation for people affected by colorectal cancer.

  • Expert consultancy provided in 2016: Strategies for implementing shared decision making by healthcare practitioners in elective surgery: a systematic reviewApril 2016 – August 2016

    Funding organisations: Health Services Charitable Gifts Board and University of Adelaide, School of Public Health
    Investigators: Dr Lucylynn Lizarondo, Associate Professor Edoardo Aromataris, Associate Professor Zachary Munn

    In collaboration with the University of Adelaide, School of Public Health.

    JBI investigators contributed to a systematic review investigating the effectiveness of strategies aimed to facilitate or improve health care practitioners’ adoption of shared decision making (SDM) in elective surgery. The review considered strategies which targeted patients (e.g. information materials, decision aids, coaching), health care practitioners (e.g. education, decision aids, audit and feedback) or health system/organisation (e.g. multifaceted interventions based on barriers assessment). Twenty trials of low to moderate quality were included in the review. The results suggest that the provision of patient information before the surgical consultation, including medical and surgical information relevant to the upcoming consultation, can increase patient participation in the decision-making process. The use of well-developed interactive multimedia, computer or DVD-based, combined with written information has the potential to cover a greater proportion of the patient population, particularly those with limited English proficiency and/or low health literacy.

    This systematic review is a component of a large SDM project funded by the Health Services Charitable Gifts Board, Adelaide, Australia.

  • Holistic and integrated models of care for young people with substance misuseSeptember 2016 – January 2017

    Funding Organisation: New South Wales Ministry of Health (via SAX Institute), Australia
    Investigator: Dr Micah Peters

    This Evidence Check review presented a summary of the evidence around effective integrated and holistic models of care for young people who have substance misuse issues. Three focus questions guided this review:

    • What integrated and holistic models of care for substance-using young people have been described and evaluated in the literature?
    • From the models of care identified in Question 1, what are key elements of successful models that provide optimal care from a bio-psycho-social viewpoint of health?
    • From the models of care identified in Question 1, what are key considerations in the design and implementation of best practice models of care for adolescents and young people that are misusing alcohol and other drugs?

    Five studies covering four holistic and/or integrated models of care for adolescents and young people with substance use disorders were included. Overall, limited evidence suggested that the included models of care may reduce substance abuse and associated problem behaviours. Key elements including case management, establishing trust and stakeholder buy-in, inclusion of social support and involvement of families and caregivers in the services provided may be associated with success of the programs. Implementation of programs was facilitated by community engagement, adequate staff straining, strong relationship building and communication with all stakeholders. Negative perception of services by clients, high staff turnover, and unwillingness of services to collaborate were identified as important barriers to program implementation.

  • The Effectiveness of Public Health Messaging for Smoke EventsJuly 2016

    Funding organisation: Victorian Department of Health and Human Services
    Investigator: Dr Micah Peters

    Exposure to smoke (e.g. from wildfires) has been associated with a number of negative health outcomes, including respiratory symptoms and conditions. The purpose of this rapid review was to investigate recent evidence (post-2009) regarding the effectiveness of public health messaging during smoke events. Ten studies were included in this review. Key results were: 1) Smoke-related public health messages are communicated via a variety of channels, but limited evidence is available regarding their effectiveness for the general public or at-risk groups; 2) Messages that use simple language are more commonly recalled, understood, and complied with. Compliance differs according to socio-demographic characteristics; 3) At-risk groups may be advised to stay indoors before the general population, in order to protect the most vulnerable people in a community. Experimental research, as well as evaluations, are required to examine the effectiveness of modern communication channels, channels to reach at-risk groups, and the ‘stay indoors’ message.

    This systematic review is a component of a large SDM project funded by the Health Services Charitable Gifts Board, Adelaide, Australia.

  • An appraisal of analytical tools, used in predicting clinical and patient reported outcomes following treatment of men with prostate cancerMarch 2016 – December 2016

    Funding organisation: Prostate Cancer Health Outcomes Research Unit, South Australia
    Investigator: Dr Jared Campbell

    Dr Jared Campbell undertook a 70 day consultancy with the South Australian Prostate Cancer Clinical Outcomes Collaborative (SA-PCCOC) to conduct systematic reviews on the prognostic accuracy of tools for the prediction of clinical and patient reported outcomes of patients treated for prostate cancer (including radiation therapy, radical prostatectomy or androgen deprivation therapy). This project generated five manuscripts which identified the most accurate and best validated tools available for use to inform clinical decision making. The SA-PCCOC team are now using the results to guide a project that utilises data from an existing register to validate prognostic tools for implementation in Australia

  • Consumer health information needs and preferencesMarch 2016 – July 2016

    Funding organisation: Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care (via SAX Institute)
    Investigator: Dr Micah Peters

    This Evidence Check review presented a summary of the evidence around consumers’ needs and preferences for information about healthcare safety and quality. Four main issues were the focus of this review:

    • When do consumers look for information about healthcare safety and quality?
    • Where do consumers find information about healthcare safety and quality and where do they want to find it?
    • How do consumers use information about healthcare safety and quality?
    • What do consumers use information about healthcare safety and quality for?

    Twenty-eight articles were included; four systematic reviews, three non-systematic literature reviews, thirteen quantitative studies, six qualitative studies, and two mixed methods studies. The results indicated that consumers seek health information at varying times along the healthcare journey and through various modes of delivery. Complacency with historical health information modes is no longer appropriate and flexibility is essential to suit growing consumer demands. It is important to ensure that health information is readily available in different formats and is not exclusive to any single medium. Further, the doctor-patient relationship is still highly valued and health professionals remain a preferred source for consumers and additional effort is required to ensure that information access is equitable for disadvantaged consumer groups.

The Joanna Briggs Institute
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Alex Mignone
Program Coordinator, Higher Degrees by Research
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